Sage

Lewis_&_Son-Sage.jpg
Lewis_&_Son-Sage.jpg

Sage

3.75

Do you ever think about the origins of everyday moods? Experts believe they spring from our observations and experiences conveyed through sight, taste, hearing smell and touch. Decidedly uplifting for people who are under stress, sage is considered one of the finest remedies for the revitalisation of body and mind. The clever cooks pick sage for its pleasantly pungent, lemony-pepper flavour and its fresh camphoric fragrance wafting from turkey stuffings, steaming casseroles, sauces and marinades. The herb is used as a seasoning for lamb, duck and game and enhances the flavour of mushroom dishes and vegetables, especially asparagus, tomatoes and butternut squash. Taken as a tisane, sage has a distinctly invigorating effect. It combines well with basil, mint, a squirt of lemon and freshly grated lime zest. Cherokee people use it as a cough and cold remedy. Sage has antibacterial properties and is used to preserve meats and as a flavouring and antioxidant in pickles, vegetables, processed foods and beverages. Sage is known to slow down the secretion of fluids and is helpful in stopping excessive sweating but should be avoided by nursing women as it may slow milk production. To transform a classic challah into a delectable savoury treat, add this fragrant herb to the butternut squash puree and mix with other standard ingredients into smooth, elastic dough. The steaming hot butternut squash and sage challah will be as pleasing to the eye as it is to the palate. Sprinkle a few small pinches of sage over roasted sweet potatoes, or add a dash of it to a delicious pumpkin penne. To satisfy those sweet cravings indulge in luscious strawberry sage popsicles.

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